Volim te Beograd!

Volim te Beograd!

If you are looking for a heart-breaking city, affordable, safe, cool and beautiful… Amazing people, tasty food, good drinks, and wild parties… Rich history, astonishing accomplishments throughout time and the intersection of the Balkans… Then Serbia is calling you.

Belgrade is a relatively small capital city compared to European ones; however it’s the biggest and richest of the Balkans. To find accommodation has never been easier since you will end up no more than fifteen minutes away from the city center Knez Mihajlova, a one kilometer-long pedestrian street full of coffee shops, restaurants, and boutiques that is named after Serbian prince Mihailo Obrenovic III.

You will usually end up in the Trg Republic (Republic Square) with any of the public transportation, where you can kick off your city tour and get that first impression of “yet one more communist city”, which is true, since it maintained the authentic architecture of its buildings dating from late 1870s, especially the national theater. Next you will be immediately amazed with the concentration of very beautiful girls and so many cheerful people, until you finish your street walk by arriving to a fortress, Kalemagdan.

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Unlike any other fortress, Kalemagdan is not only a historical monument filled with old rocks but also it contains:

  • A war museum showcasing the catalogue of Yugoslavian weapons that were manufactured to fight against the morons of the 18th and 19th centuries.
  • A park for day and night walks, surrounded with gates and remarkable for its “Viktor”, standing tall and proud, “the protector of Belgrade” as they say. Belgrade is one of few cities around the world that has been unbeatable although many tries by the Romans, Ottomans, Byzantine, Bulgarians, and Hungarians. Even Bill Clinton tried, and failed.
  • An astonishing view of the split between the Danube and Sava rivers, topped by unique sunset views in the midst of the new Beograd’s towers, the new economic hub of Serbia.

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Belgrade is home to Saint Sava Church, one of the largest Orthodox churches in the world named after its founder. It’s a gorgeous building regardless of its signification and it turns insanely beautiful by night.

While you walk around the city center, you can easily notice that almost all government buildings have been renovated after the Serbian revolution’s footprint, except the Yugoslav Army Headquarters hit by the NATO during the 37th (out of 76) day of aggression April 29th in the name of freedom and democracy. Still standing strong, the government is still confused on the future of this building. They are even more beautiful and nicely lightened at night.

Fast food is exceptionally good in Belgrade compared to its neighbors, either the local Pljeskavica aka Serbian burger Sarma, cabbage for breakfast, Karadjordje Knedle for dessert or the famous Bosnian Cevapi.

Belgrade is not only for enjoying culture, history, night life, food or the sights; Serbia is home for the Greatest of all, Nikola Tesla Museum. About a ten minute walk from Knez, the museum features works by one of the greatest inventors of the centuries Nikola Tesla, and lets you experience demos on wireless energy and free energy, which are just a few of Nikola’ 740 inventions, simply a must do.

I love Serbia so much and Belgrade in particular, not because I haven’t been to other countries/cities around the world, but simply because it contains a great deal of greatness from its history, cultures, sights, cost of living, charm … all the way to its people, those who make the difference. You feel home in Serbia, in fact I used to call it my second home, until a very good friend of mine clarified my thoughts and said “you look tired, may be because you’ve been away from home for a while now”.

K.G

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